Tuesday, March 31, 2009

Wednesday in Lent 5


Here is one criterion for discernment. Does what you are hearing (or reading) sound like the voice of the Jesus you know from the Gospels? (Not to be confused with the Jesus portrayed by others, I hasten to clarify.)

If it sounds like Jesus, pay attention. If it does not, be cautious, very cautious.


Almighty God our heavenly Father, renew in us the gifts of your mercy; increase our faith, strengthen our hope, enlighten our understanding, widen our charity, and make us ready to serve you; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.


Chichester Psalms - Leonard Bernstein



The 2nd movement of Leonard Bernstein's Chichester Psalms, titled "Adonai ro-i", is a combination of psalms 2 and 23. Countertenor Lawrence Zazzo with the choir of Clare College, Cambridge

--the BB

5 comments:

Grandmère Mimi said...

Good words about following Jesus, Paul.

I remember the first time heard a countertenor sing a very long time ago. It was astonishing. All those I've heard speak after snging had normal male voices. Are they singig falsetto?

Lovely video.

Paul said...

Though I heard them sing several times I have never asked one about the technique. Glad you enjoyed it.

gerry said...

Lawrence Zazzo is singing in a "normal" countertenor voice. It is an astonishing sound.

A local countertenor tells me that while he and many countertenors can sing falsetto, he rarely does because it is easy to strain his voice in falsetto.

Steven has sung all over the world and is in demand for countertenor roles in Barogue Opera. His La Scala debut was in a production of a Monteverdi Opera (I forgootten the specific one).

Paul said...

Thank you, Gerry, for clarifying this and answering Mimi's question. It is what I suspected but I didn't really know.

Grandmère Mimi said...

Gerry, thanks. I can imagine that singing falsetto for prolonged periods would strain the voice. I'd think that the gifted countertenors are in great demand, because there are not many of them.